Iowa Caucus app was not the problem

What was the problem?

People who think they needed a bespoke app when current mature technology exists that could do what they wanted. Because they hired an agency and the agency isn’t going to tell them otherwise.

People who didn’t know how to procure, test or do quality assurance, stress testing or security reviews of software. Because they assumed that the agency would just be on top of all that.

People who didn’t think about usability of software or incorporate time to train users how to run it. Because they think technology is magic. It’s not. It’s duplicitous, treacherous and narrow minded. Technology does whatever you’ve built it to do, not what you thought you built it to do. You need usability testing, testing and testing for it to start approximating what you’d hope it would do.

People were the problem. People operating under this idea that technology is some sort of magic, and you don’t need to have anyone on your team who understands it because you’ll just outsource all of that. People are always the problem. Challenge assumptions. Ask if you need to take this trip. What would happen if you didn’t? What is the problem you’re trying to fix? Who said it’ was a problem to begin with? Are they right? Using technology starts with questions. If you’re not interested in that, then stay away from proposing solutions with it.

The app wasn’t the problem. It was the output of the problem.

Hard reboot

I killed the old blog, which you may have been forwarded from. With regard to the name of the new one, both the first and second definitions apply. I do this every so often. The last site replace the one before that, and that one replaced an earlier one, still. It’s become sort of a nod to the idea that you can remake yourself online. Until other people start taking over that job for you, anyway.

Do you really want to know?